leonie cornelius

LEONIE CORNELIUS & FRIENDS
leonie-cornelius-salt-scrub-beauty-colin-gillen-rosemary
leonie-cornelius-sea-salt-beauty-scrub-roesmary-colin-gillen
leonie-cornelius-beauty-scrub.2
leonie-cornelius-beauty-scrub
leonie-cornelius-beauty-scrub

Himalayan Rosemary Salt Scrub

As I write this there is a howling wind outside and the temperature is close to freezing. Winter in Ireland can be a tricky time for gardens. Most perennials have now died down and all we are left with are the strong evergreen structural plants to give gardens some colour.

One plant that I love using for so may different reasons is the Rosemary plant (Rosmarinus officinalis). This wonderful kitchen herb is known to most people as a herb to add to cooking. Perfect with Lamb, chicken, roasts, fish and potatoes this herb is so versatile in the kitchen and goes well with almost everything. The thing it is known best for in the kitchen is adding that Mediterranean flavour to everything from a barbacue to soups.

The word Rosemary comes from the words ‘Ros’ meaning dew and Marinus’ meaning the sea. This bushy perennial is native to the Mediterranean region and in its native habitat grows wild all over rocky cliffs and does amazingly well on rocky slopes along coastlines.

Rosemary as well as Lavender, Thyme and Sage are all so well suited to the dry summers of the Mediterranean and thrive in poor soil with plenty of drainage.  Here in Ireland growing Rosemary can be tricky and it is vital to find the right spot for it. I have seen it doing absolutely brilliantly in certain places and then also failing miserably in other locations. Basically, the best spot is the dry sloped south facing bank, where there is no build up of moisture. This will also prevent the roots freezing in Winter, which can kill the plant.

I am particularly fond of this evergreen, edible herb for its wonderful scented structural qualities in the garden. I love that you can shape rosemary into hedges and one of my favourite ways of using it in garden design is using the plant to form soft overspilling structural hedges at the borders of perennial beds. I also love planting them in pretty containers which allows you to bring them under cover in the Winter months.

Apart from its benefits in the culinary world and in the garden this plant has many medicinal qualities. When you crush the leaves of the plant they release volatile chemicals and the strong scent of camphor and pine is instantly recognizable.

Ancient Greek and Roman and Arab herbalists used this herb for many health ailments. One main one was the a rosemary conditioner which not only conditioned the hair but was also said to prevent baldness. To this day you can find Rosemary oil in many beauty treatments from Shampoos to face creams and bath oils.  This is a true testament to the amazing properties that Rosemary has within it’s woody stems and waxy leaves.

The leaves contain a certain phyto-chemical compound that are aid to prevent diseases and promote health while the flower tops in particular contain a phenolic anti-oxidant which are said to have rubefacient or counter-irritant properties, making the oil anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic and anti-septic.

The oil which is released is perfect for using as a beauty oil or as an ingredient in a face mask. The oils contain a wide array of nutrients such as vitamins, antioxidants, iron and calcium and are a great way of treating tired or irritated skin.

Rosemary is also said to be the herb of memory and are said to quicken the mind and prevent forgetfulness. Interestingly compounds isolated from the Rosemary and Spearmint plant were shown to boost memory and learning in certain behavioural tests making it very relevant to those suffering from dementia and Alzheimers. Certainly, many side-effects of this illness can be treated with potent essential oils and Rosemary oil is said to be very beneficial in uplifting mood, stimulating the mind and combating the signs of depression.

So you can see why I love this herb…from cooking to borders and even to combating depression. This versatile shrub is a must in every garden.

Beauty Tip

leonie-cornelius-beauty-scrub

Rosemary and Himilayan Salt Scrub

Rosemary is another shrub that looks particularly well in the colder months of the year. Its shiny leaves are a wonderful shade of green in the Winter garden and the scent  on a sunny day is wonderful. The oil which is released in Rosemary when it is crushed is perfect for using as a beauty oil or as an ingredient in a face mask. The oils contain a wide array of nutrients such as vitamins, antioxidants, iron and calcium and are a great way of treating tired or irritated skin.

Ancient Greek and Roman and Arab herbalists used this herb for many health ailments. One main one was the a rosemary conditioner which not only conditioned the hair but was also said to prevent baldness. To this day you can find Rosemary oil in many beauty treatments from Shampoos to face creams and bath oils.  This is a true testament to the amazing properties that Rosemary has within it’s woody stems and waxy leaves.

I like to mix a dollop of coconut oil with a few spoons of Himilayan salt and some crushed Rosemary for an easy beauty scrub. You can also leave it on as a mask but as the oil tends to melt make sure you have a towel underneath.

leonie-cornelius-beauty-scrub.2leonie-cornelius-beauty-scrub

 

0
Photo By: colin gillen

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published.